Dublin, Ireland ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช

Welcome to Dublin, a warm and welcoming capital, much like the inside of an Irish pub! Visit this vibrant city surrounding the River Liffey, explore the cobbled streets and twisting alleys teeming with live music. Sit back, relax and enjoy the craic!

Temple Bar

Need to quench your thirst? Or maybe it’s some live music you fancy? Then wander over to Temple Bar where the cobbled streets are lined with bars and restaurants a-plenty.

The Temple Bar itself was established in 1840 and is 1 of Ireland’s most famous bars, due to being the home of Ireland’s extensive whisky collection, featuring 450 different whiskies. Pop in to the traditional Irish pub, or ‘old man’ pub as the Dubliners call them for a tipple or 2!

Dublin, Ireland ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช
Dublin, Ireland ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช
Dublin, Ireland ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช

The Brazen Head

After visiting one of Ireland’s most famous pubs, how about going to Ireland’s oldest pub?

The Brazen Head’s present building has been around since 1754 and started life as a coaching inn. However, the Brazen Head itself appears in documents that go back as far as 1653. There has been an inn on this patch of land since 1198.

This is a great place for a drink and a snack while soaking up the atmosphere. There is live music every night!

Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

St. Stephen’s Green Park

Stroll through this beautiful park which is located at the end of Grafton Street. Admire the carefully crafted flower displays or sit on a bench and take in the tranquility of the lake.

As well as being a peaceful place to relax, this garden is full of history, some of which you can learn about from signs throughout the park.

During the Easter Rising of 1916, members of the Irish Citizen Army took position on the green and confiscated vehicles from roadblocks to surround the park and dug defensive positions in the actual park. However, they were fired upon by the British Army from a hotel overlooking the park and had to retreat to the Royal College of Surgeons building located on the west side of the green. If you look closely at the top of the Royal College of Surgeons building and at the Fusilier’s Arch at the park entrance, you can spot the bullet holes.

The wildlife didn’t suffer! Gunfire was halted temporarily so the ducks could be fed.

Dublin, Ireland ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡ช
St stephens park
Fusilier’s Arch
St Stephen's Green Park
St Stephen's Green Park

Grafton Street

Walk down this main street to satisfy retail therapy needs, listen to the buskers or to stop for coffee and a snack in one of the many cafes.

Halfway down is a side street. See if you can spot St. Ann’s Church at the end, making this is a lovely photo spot.

The church was built in Baroque style at the beginning of the 18th century and was just one of the few Dublin churches to survive the century. The original faรงade wasn’t completed above the first floor, so in 1868 there was a competition for a new faรงade. This was won by Thomas Newenham Deane who has been involved in design work at Oxford University.

Interesting feature: The Bread Shelf. In 1723 as a result of a bequest by Lord Newtown, bread was made available daily for anyone who wished to receive it and was placed on a shelf, hence the name.

St Ann's Church
St. Ann’s Church

St Stephen’s Green Shopping Centre

For those interested in architecture, have a look at the upper level of this shopping centre.

It’s also a good way to pass a rainy morning as it has a wide variety of shops, plenty of cafes, a food court if you’re hungry and even an Irish gift shop!

Dublin, Ireland

Dublin Post Office

Located in O’Connell Street, Dublin’s General Post Office (GPO) is the headquarters for the Irish Postal Service with the stone for the foundations being laid in 1814. It was also a well known stronghold in the 1916 Easter Rising for Irish Volunteers and bullet holes can still be seen on the columns outside. After the Easter Rising, the post office was destroyed by a fire and all that remained was the facade and the front portico. The post office was rebuilt in 1929 and includes a cafe and the Witness History Museum, which is a great place to start learning about with Irish history. Now, the GPO is a place for remembrance and protests but after 2 centuries, it I still functioning as a post office.

Top Tip: Closed on Sundays

GPO
Dublin, Ireland

Ha’penny Bridge

Officially the Liffey Bridge but known as the Ha’penny Bridge, it was built in 1816. Before the bridge there were ferries crossing the river but these were run down and in bad condition. The owner, William Walsh was given an ultimatum: fix them or build a bridge. He decided to build a bridge and was allowed to charge a toll of a ha’penny to anyone crossing the bridge for the next 100 years. A condition of the bridge building was that the toll would be removed if Dubliners were opposed to it. A ha’penny was chosen as this was the ferry charge and the toll lasted until 1919.

Ha'penny Bridge
Ha'penny Bridge

Dublin Spire

Alternatively called the Monument of Light, this stainless steel, pin like monument at 120 metres tall is hard to miss. It was designed by Ian Ritchie Architects who were looking for an ‘elegant and dynamic simplicity bridging art and technology’ and is built on the former site of Nelson’s Pillar and the statue of William Blakeney on O’Connell Street.

It was completed in 2003 and at dusk the base is lit up and the top 10 metres are illuminated by 11884 holes through which light-emiting diodes shine.

Dublin Spire

Doors of Dublin

Just wondering around Dublin you will spot some brilliant Georgian doors! Stop, admire and take a picture! The most photographed door is found at 46 Fitzwilliam Square.

Ireland was part of the British Empire for 800 years before it claimed independence and 1 story suggests that the doors were painted as a form of protest. When Queen Victoria died, the residents were ordered to paint their doors black as a form of mourning but they rebelled and painted them every colour of the rainbow apart from black!

Another story is that the colourful doors are to help the locals recognise their doors after a night at the pub. The legend started with 2 Irish writers: George Moore and Oliver St. John Gogarty. Gogarty would come home drunk and confused and end up knocking on Moore’s door. To stop this from becoming a regular occurrence, Moore painted his door green and Gogarty painted his door red!

Doors of Dublin
46 Fitzwilliam Square
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin Doors
Dublin, Ireland

St. Patrick’s Cathedral

Founded in 1191 in honour of Ireland’s patron saint this is one of the few buildings left from medieval Dublin. St. Patrick’s is currently the national cathedral of the Church of Ireland as well as being the largest in Ireland.

The author of ‘Gulliver’s Travels’, Jonathon Swift was the cathedral’s Dean in 1700 and is buried on site.

The world famous choir was established in 1432 and can be heard daily during term time.

Top Tip: Free guided tours take place throughout the day

Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

Anne’s Lane

If you’re walking along Anne’s Lane and find yourself outside a bar called Zozimus, look up! Above your head is an instagrammable installation of colourful umbrellas, brightening up the lane on a grey day.

Dublin, Ireland

Leprechaun Museum

Immerse yourself in Irish folklore with a fun storytelling experience by visiting the National Leprechaun Museum to learn about said creatures and other mythical animals!

Take a trip back to your childhood and become versed about mythical Ireland.

Dublin, Ireland

River Liffey

Take a stroll along the banks and admire the river that is beautiful by both day and night. On a warm evening, stop at one of the bars and watch the world go by.

Dublin, Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

The Meeting Place

This is a bronze sculpture that has been designed by Jackie McKenna to show life in Dublin. The statue depicts women who have stopped for a chat and are surrounded by shopping bags. One of the bags was stolen, which must have been very difficult as it was made from bronze! Like most Dublin statues this one has been nicknamed ‘the hags with bags’.

Dublin, Ireland

Davy Byrnes

This cosmopolitan pub/restaurant has been serving Dubliners since 1798 and is still around as the food is fantastic. James Joyce used to be a regular patron and Davy Byrnes became known as the literary pub.

Top Tip: Book a table as it becomes very busy! Have a look at these food and drink apps to make reservations

Dublin, Ireland
Davy Byrnes
Davy Byrnes
Dublin, Ireland
I recommend the Irish Rainbow Carrots

Church Bar

Another excellent drinking hole is inside this renovated church. Enjoy a coffee by the confessional box, a pint while sitting in a pew or a cocktail at the bar while admiring the beautiful stained glass windows and organs.

St. Mary’s Church was built in the 18th century and then finally abandoned in 1964 where it stood derelict until it was purchased in 1997 and restored. The building has been classified as a place of historical interest and is associated with several historical characters. Arthur Guinness (founder of the Guinness Brewery was married here, Sean O’Casey who was an author and playwright was baptised here and Jonathon Swift was was an author and the Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral attended services here.

Church Bar
Church Bar
Church Bar
Church Bar

C.King

Brit girl on a bummel. A solo female traveller accompanied by her camera, aiming to see as much of the world as possible and sharing what she's learnt along the way!

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